Tag Archives: fatou seidi ghali

Les Filles de Illighadad Tour 2018

Les Filles de Illighadad Tour 2018
Les Filles de Illighadad are back on tour for 2018. Check out full dates below, across the EU + onto the Réunion Islands. They’ll be joined for the first time with Amariam Ahmed, guitarist from Agadez (profiled here back in 2014). You can stay up to date on the tour via the FB page.

1 Feb – Mousonturm – Frankfurt D
3 Feb – Roter Salon – Berlin D
8 Feb – Festival Hors Pistes – Annecy FR
9 Feb – Generiq Festival – Dijon FR
10 Feb – Generiq Festival  – Belfort FR
11 Feb – La Maroquinerie  – Paris FR
13 Feb – La Coope – Clermont Ferrand FR
14 Feb – Le 106 – Rouen FR
15 Feb – Stereolux  – Nantes FR
16 Feb – La Sirène  – La Rochelle FR
17 Feb – L’Astrolabe  – Orleans FR
20 Feb – Kabardock – Le Port Reunion
22 Feb – Le Zinzin – Grand Bois Reunion
23 Feb – Le Bisik  – Saint Benoit Reunion
24 Feb – L’Auditorium De La Médiathèque Tampon  – Reunion
25 Feb – Théatre Sous Les Arbres – Le Port Reunion
28 Feb – Kafe Antzokia – Bilbao Spain
1 Mar – Lata De Zinc – Oviedo Spain
2 Mar – Radar Estudio – Vigo Spain
3 Mar – Putzuzulo Gaztetxea – Zarautz Spain
4 Mar – Centro Civica Delicias  – Zaragoza Spain
5 Mar – Sala X  – Seville Spain
6 Mar – Sufre  – Valencia Spain
7 Mar – Centro Benito Moliner  – Huesca Spain
8 Mar – Artte  – Barcelona Spain
9 Mar – Cafe Berlin  – Madrid Spain
10 Mar – Teatro  – Espinho Portugal
11 Mar – ZDB  – Lisbon Portugal

Agrim Agadez – musique guitare de la republique du niger

Agrim Agadez

The newest release from Sahel Sounds is titled Agrim Agadez , a compilation of field recordings of guitar music from the Sahelian empire of Niger. Focusing on guitar music throughout the country, and recorded over many years of travels, Agrim Agadez celebrates the diversity of the instrument in the contemporary Sahel.

Like most of the Sahel, the guitar is found in every corner of Niger. Whether acoustic, electric, or built by hand, guitars are highly prized possessions and continue to inspire. Every corner of Niger has particular languages, customs, and cultures, and each corner has taken the instrument and transformed it in its own special way: from bar bands of the southern Hausa land, pastoral flock owning village autodidacts, rag-tag DIY wedding rock musicians, to political minded folk guitarists. Agrim Agadez follows the sounds overheard playing on cassettes, seeking out the once legendary local heroes in their hometowns, and stumbling upon musicians in accidental chance encounters.

For readers of the blog, it’s familiar territory. Much of the music has been shared here over the years, as yours truly was faithfully updating the blog from remote cyber cafes and borrowed cellphone wi-fi. It’s also a continuation of two other records that delved into the same subject, the debut Ishilan n-Tenere, and the subsequent Laila Je T’Aime. Field recordings have always been a foundation of this work (if for anything else, an opportunity to travel!), but there is a certain element to the live recording that is hard to replicate in a controlled sterile space of the studio.

While it would be nice to claim that the record is comprehensive and academic, Agrim Agadez is not that album. This is not a record of research, but something to listen to. You can draw your own conclusions. However, it is a faithful document of the guitar as it’s heard, experienced in the open air studios of Niger with a single microphone, with backdrops of children’s voices, crickets, and village ambience. But above all, it’s a record of people who once upon a time, decided to pick up the guitar and play a song.

The record is available now on vinyl from our shop with 16 page liner notes w/ photos and bios of the bands. You can also listen/download on bandcamp.

Les Filles de Illighadad Fall Tour 2016

Les Filles de Illighadad Tour Poster

Les Filles de Illighadad arrived in Europe yesterday, and have begun their debut tour across the EU! The four piece, all hailing from the village of Illighadad in the region of Abalak, plays a combination of tende and guitar music.

Tuareg guitar music as a genre is increasingly familiar outside of the desert. But the origins of the music are in the tende. The tende (previously) is a water drum, formed out mortar and pestle, stretched across with animal skin. It falls into that designation as traditional, though I would offer “village music” as it retains a dominant role, particularly in the countryside; accompanying village celebration, but also a therapeutic and curative trance inducing music.

Les Filles de Illighadad differs from the multitude of guitar bands and tende troupes in their curious bridging of these worlds. Guitarist Fatou Seidi Ghali, one of only two female guitarists in Niger in a overtly male dominated genre, leads the troupe with songs adopted from the tende repertoire – making them one of the few groups to pursue this path. After 30 some years of ishumar guitar, it’s a curious and exciting development. As the band makes their first travel across Europe, Illighadad awaits with anxious ears.

fatou seidi ghali, les filles de illighadad, video

Video of Fatou Seidi Ghali from Les Filles de Illighadad, the tuareg guitar and tende duo from central Niger. Fatou is featured on the recent LP of the same name.

The above footage was shot by neopan kollektiv for the upcoming film [play][record] – a story of sahel sounds.

Les Filles de Illighadad may be touring this fall in Europe, so stay tuned.